Tech correspondent at Reuters in Tokyo

reuters office
Sunset reflection from the Reuters office in Tokyo

I cut my journalistic teeth at Reuters in Tokyo, where I worked from early 2012 to late 2014. During that time I mostly covered Japan’s biggest technology firms, writing about Sony’s struggle to become profitable in electronics, Toshiba’s bid to grow its nuclear business, and Panasonic’s transformation into a B2B company. I also took on cow wearables and other advances in high-tech farming, the role of deregulation in Japan’s robotics revolution, and the perennial hope that the smart home and fridges that text you at work will be the next big thing.

In addition to tech, I also dug deep into the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami and Fukushima nuclear clean-up, broke news on the bitcoin scandal at Mt. Gox, covered the Latin American contingent in Spanish at an IMF summit, and penned a wide range of cultural articles, from the rise of Japanese whisky to inappropriate brand names, Japan’s antiquated dancing ban and the country’s answer to Banksy.

Most of my interviews and research were conducted in Japanese.

daibek white suit
Reporting in the Fukushima exclusion zone

A selection of my feature articles at Reuters:

Insight: Japan’s nuclear clean-up: costly, complex and at risk of failing

For many Fukushima evacuees, the truth is they won’t be going home 

Special Report: Help wanted in Fukushima: Low pay, high risks and gangsters (additional reporting)

Insight: At Mt. Gox bitcoin hub, ‘geek’ CEO sought both control and escape 

Exclusive: Mt. Gox faced questions on handling client cash long before crisis

Japan’s whisky makers drum up global market for their drams 

Silicon to spinach: Japan tech helps farmers cope with climate shifts 

Deregulation at heart of Japan’s new robotics revolution

Your fridge just texted: Japan electronics firms pin hopes on ‘smart’ appliances  

A minicar named Hustler? Japan’s brand names raise eyebrows 

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